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After watching the documentary Field Trip to the DMZ

Patriotism gives a positive vibe to me, and stands beside other words that I like–such as glory, honor, and pride. Upon just hearing them I can feel this warmth. Even unity has a nice, wholesome ring to it. But say “reunification,” and I wouldn’t feel anything. In fact, I would not want to hear it again.

Of course, people try to give an explanation to that. As part of the new generation of South Koreans, I don’t have the sisterly connection to the people of the North. People have family living there, and they might as well be on the opposite side of the world.

Am I supposed to feel some ancestral connection regardless? Am I a heartless person for thinking that people who want reunification just because they want to see their families might be a little ignorant, if not selfish, because of the political upheaval it would require, the probable necessity of force, and the burdens it may press upon the struggling South Korean government and economy?

Does reunification sound more probable than the North Korean government turning over a new leaf and starting to actually provide its citizen’s rights and needs?

Why do they ask for reunification anyway? Why can’t they wish for North Korea to open up to the world and let people move back and forth?

What kind of warmth do they feel from the word “reunification” that I don’t react in any way to?

Of course all I would be doing is asking questions. I’m not even proud of being a Korean, and I have minimal connections to Korean culture. I feel bad for the way North Koreans are being abandoned by their government, I hope there is some way to change that, but I feel no reason to want reunification.

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The architecture, the dance, the painting may still feel remote to the average civilian. However, modernism-style furniture is a clear indicator of how this culture can exist in our everyday lives. This chair, like the building, follows the style of simplicity, with solid bright colors and geometric structure. This chair is much less detailed than the elaborately carved 18th-century chairs, perhaps promoting a more wholistic and simple view of life and one's environment.

The architecture, the dance, the painting may still feel remote to the average civilian. However, modernism-style furniture is a clear indicator of how this culture can exist in our everyday lives. This chair, like the building, follows the style of simplicity, with solid bright colors and geometric structure. This chair is much less detailed than the elaborately carved 18th-century chairs, perhaps promoting a more wholistic and simple view of life and one's environment.

A few snippets of modernism:

A huge chunk of modern art is Pop Art, the use of bright colors and solid shapes in everyday life. Like many others, this piece is an eclectic collection of patterns and shades and have greatly contrasting elements. The picture overall isn't complicated, but is a breaking-down of everyday things into a shape-oriented perspective.

A huge chunk of modern art is Pop Art, the use of bright colors and solid shapes in everyday life. Like many others, this piece is an eclectic collection of patterns and shades and have greatly contrasting elements. The picture overall isn't complicated, but is a breaking-down of everyday things into a shape-oriented perspective.

 

Modern architecture also incorporates the use of simple shapes in real life. This building is designed to look like a sphere, and its silver metal color accentuates the simplicity of modern style.

Modern architecture also incorporates the use of simple shapes in real life. This building is designed to look like a sphere, and its silver metal color accentuates the simplicity of modern style.

 

Modern dance emphasizes free expression. As indicated in this scene, the dancers all have individual poses that create an overall feeling instead of following a rigid choreography. Another interesting trait is that modern dancers tend to dance barefoot, and do not wear uniform costumes. All these efforts symbolize the breaking away from the structured rules of dance into a more relaxed, free style.

Modern dance emphasizes free expression. As indicated in this scene, the dancers all have individual poses that create an overall feeling instead of following a rigid choreography. Another interesting trait is that modern dancers tend to dance barefoot, and do not wear uniform costumes. All these efforts symbolize the breaking away from the structured rules of dance into a more relaxed, free style.

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We label teenage movies as “chick flicks” due to their bubbly, carefree tone and escapist fun.  Teen movies use stereotypes and exaggerate lives of emotional adolescents to entertain their key audience, teenage girls acclimated to Western culture, and to direct them towards maturity by mocking the frivolous aspects of adolescence.

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Wendy in Peter Pan looks out the window with yearning eyes.  She represents the transition from a child to an adult when she realizes in Neverland, where Peter lives, that she doesn’t want to stay a child forever.  She wants to be a great older sister, a nurturing mother, and a responsible individual.

Wendy in Peter Pan looks out the window with yearning eyes. She represents the transition from a child to an adult when she realizes in Neverland, where Peter lives, that she doesn’t want to stay a child forever. She wants to be a great older sister, a nurturing mother, and a responsible individual.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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In The Hot Chick, Jessica Spencer’s lines are very sentimental. After learning that lots of people don’t like her at the school because she’s spoiled and mean, and that her boyfriend genuinely loves her for who she is, she realizes that she’s been a fool all along.

 

 

 

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In Greek mythology, Aphrodite came to Mount Olympus where the gods lived, when she was about 18.  She’s the most beautiful goddess, and with her awareness of this, often taunted others.  In this picture, with her confident and striking pose, she knows that men desire her and flaunts her body.

In Greek mythology, Aphrodite came to Mount Olympus where the gods lived, when she was about 18. She’s the most beautiful goddess, and with her awareness of this, often taunted others. In this picture, with her confident and striking pose, she knows that men desire her and flaunts her body.

 

Also, Zeus was infamous for his infinite extramarital love affairs with women he found physically appealing.  In one case, as shown here, he came down as a swan to seduce and rape Leda, a young woman who conceded to his lust.

Also, Zeus was infamous for his infinite extramarital love affairs with women he found physically appealing. In one case, as shown here, he came down as a swan to seduce and rape Leda, a young woman who conceded to his lust.

 

 

 

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In John Tucker Must Die, instead of introducing himself further with proper manners, Justin takes the brownies to Kate’s mom and tries to seduce her because she is “so hot,” regardless of their age difference and the inappropriateness of a potential relationship.

 

 

 

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The famous balcony scene in Romeo and Juliet symbolizes their secret fulfillment of their forbidden love.  They embrace very passionately here, but only because it’s night and Juliet’s alone do the couple kiss unabashedly.

The famous balcony scene in Romeo and Juliet symbolizes their secret fulfillment of their forbidden love. They embrace very passionately here, but only because it’s night and Juliet’s alone do the couple kiss unabashedly.

 

 

 

 

 

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In Mean Girls, Regina George the queen-bee of high school is shown kissing another guy apart from her boyfriend, Aaron.  This betrayal reflects how teen movies emphasize our impulsive nature, our indulgence in fantasy without realizing consequences.

In Mean Girls, Regina George the queen-bee of high school is shown kissing another guy apart from her boyfriend, Aaron. This betrayal reflects how teen movies emphasize our impulsive nature, our indulgence in fantasy without realizing consequences.

9:10-9:45: In this clip from Mean Girls, Cady Heron, the newcomer in high school, sabotages the Plastics (teen royalty) at first as a deal with her art friends, but later to become the queen bee herself.  Parents are unsuspecting and don’t know what’s going on until later. 

 

 

 

 

 

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In The Vain Crow, a crow tries to cover himself up with peacock feathers so that he could hide his own black ones.  His arrogant posture—with his head towards the sky—shows how in the story he scorns other crows for their “ugliness” and tries to fit in with the peacocks.  However, the picture ridicules the pretentiousness of the crow by juxtaposing it with a real peacock, which he will never be.  Overall, it shows us that we should accept ourselves.

In The Vain Crow, a crow tries to cover himself up with peacock feathers so that he could hide his own black ones. His arrogant posture—with his head towards the sky—shows how in the story he scorns other crows for their “ugliness” and tries to fit in with the peacocks. However, the picture ridicules the pretentiousness of the crow by juxtaposing it with a real peacock, which he will never be. Overall, it shows us that we should accept ourselves.

 

Website about Maxine Hong Kingston: In the sixth sentence of the third bullet point underneath The Woman Warrior: General, Maxine Hong Kingston discovers who she is by exploring her family’s Chinese ethnicity.  She conveys her process of learning about her background and grasping who she is: in The Woman Warrior, she jumps from legend to present, and to different point of views.

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Regina George from Mean Girls is being “celebrated” as the Queen Bee of the school, like a real royal family or God would be worshipped by the common people. She is elevated above everyone else and is the stereotypical blonde, pretty “ideal” that all girls want to follow.

Regina George from Mean Girls is being “celebrated” as the Queen Bee of the school, like a real royal family or God would be worshipped by the common people. She is elevated above everyone else and is the stereotypical blonde, pretty “ideal” that all girls want to follow.

 

2:44-3:30: This classification shows how prominent cliques are in a teenager’s life. It is important to belong somewhere, and it is so inflexible that just a slight difference will make the group lose its “identity”. The archetype of self identity is stereotyped into the frivolous perspective of a teenager. 

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In the picture of Snow White, she is being saved by a Prince with whom she will live happy ever after.  Good triumphs over Evil

In the picture of Snow White, she is being saved by a Prince with whom she will live happy ever after. Good triumphs over Evil

In this picture of Cinderella, her fairy godmother makes her dreams come true; in both situations, the main characters gain happiness without needing to make too much of an effort.  It’s the kind of story that makes you put your hand on your heart and sigh, it’s the kind of story that you can only dream about.

In this picture of Cinderella, her fairy godmother makes her dreams come true; in both situations, the main characters gain happiness without needing to make too much of an effort. It’s the kind of story that makes you put your hand on your heart and sigh, it’s the kind of story that you can only dream about.

 

 

 

 

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Sydney White is a damsel in distress and her Prince Charming comes just in time to save her with a kiss. This depicts a coincidence that could only happen in a fairytale and that teenagers stereotypically dream about.

Sydney White is a damsel in distress and her Prince Charming comes just in time to save her with a kiss. This depicts a coincidence that could only happen in a fairytale and that teenagers stereotypically dream about.

 

In the clip from The Hot Chick, the girls talk about love in a dream-like way, with giggles and brief, wistful pauses. This stereotypes the unrealistic way in which teenagers perceive love and how they cannot connect it to real life due to their high emotional instability. 

 

 

 

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 Website about Macbeth: Macbeth and his wife are hiding behind happy-faced masks, which are white and innocent. These faces would tell nothing of the blood that surrounds the two and their scheming expressions. In the story, Lady Macbeth goes through intense emotional struggles even though no one is blaming him before she finally kills herself.

 

 

 

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In this picture from Mean Girls, Cady is hugging a girl who had been defending Regina George’s backstabbing Cady, instead of helping her get closer to him. Usually, a hug is given for positive purposes, to symbolize good feelings. But it is clear that this hug is an act of façade because Cady’s real face, which the other girl can’t see, shows no sign of forgiveness.

In this picture from Mean Girls, Cady is hugging a girl who had been defending Regina George’s backstabbing Cady, instead of helping her get closer to him. Usually, a hug is given for positive purposes, to symbolize good feelings. But it is clear that this hug is an act of façade because Cady’s real face, which the other girl can’t see, shows no sign of forgiveness.

 

This picture shows what Cady really wants to do to Regina—start attacking her for the horrible thing she did to Cady—but what Cady doesn’t do because in the stereotypical girl world, she must maintain a façade and try attack Regina secretly.

This picture shows what Cady really wants to do to Regina—start attacking her for the horrible thing she did to Cady—but what Cady doesn’t do because in the stereotypical girl world, she must maintain a façade and try attack Regina secretly.

 Prompt 1:

  The original archetypes stand out with their age, as they stem from classic literature, mythology, and art that have stayed with us since the ancient times; they outline adolescence facts that point to self struggles, conflicts in teenagers’ environments, and rebellion. On the other hand, today’s teen movies take these themes and overuse them in corny ways. The stereotypes are more specific to the teenage world and focused on showing how the archetype themes negatively portray adolescent life. It is no wonder teen movies are marketed as “chick flicks” or “rom coms”; companies pander them to the main target audience of teenage girls accustomed to American pop culture. The male elderly would least relate with the contents of these movies, as the huge generation and gender gap renders them unable to empathize with the problems and feelings that the characters experience. The images function in two levels—to entertain the audience and to teach them lessons about growing up.

Prompt 2:

  From our observations after watching countless teen movies, we came to conclude that they recycle and reuse stereotypes for two purposes—to entertain the audience, the majority being teenage girls, and to teach them a lesson at the same time.

  Teen movies draw ideas from a variety of archetypes because of their highly emotional, chaotic, and dramatic nature. They show what teenagers are attracted to, including fluffy fairytale endings, and also are familiar with, such as angst-driven catfights. These stereotypes are exaggerated because teen movies tend to mock them, but they are further presented in a relatable way for most teens. For example, “chick flicks” like Mean Girls and The Hot Chick inflate the scale of sabotage and subversion among girls, but simultaneously highlight the essence of high school drama. Through these overdrawn caricatures of adolescence, teenagers may come to realize how ridiculous and petty their priorities have been all along. The coming-of-age theme is equally parodied in maudlin, sentimental ways. The protagonist matures with an amazing epiphany, filled with sappy lines of an “attitude of gratitude,” after facing rocky relationships and taking things for granted. Teen movies mock this cliché to avoid becoming a blatantly patronizing, “we’ll-teach-you-a-lesson” Disney show for young children.

  Overused issues that these movies bring up, such as pregnancy, alcohol use, and bullying, bring more attention to them and allow teenagers to reflect on them more. They demonstrate that we are not alone in our problems, and many others our age also go through the ones that we struggle to overcome obstacles. At the same time, they provide an outlet of pure escapist entertainment: while there are clashes between cliques and questionable “romance,” life’s woes are quickly settled and resolved.
People want to escape from the harsh realities of life in general. We observed that a teen movie is a distorted mirror that the audience can look into and can still find reality in.

  After completing our project, we were amazed by how much depth we could find from the lighthearted teen movies that we occasionally treat ourselves with. However, with the ambition to enlighten our class with as much of what we discovered as possible, we were not able to manage our presentation time efficiently. A run-through on Mr. Jones’s computer could have also prevented some of our technical difficulties. But overall, we were able to effectively communicate the meaning behind the happy-go-lucky teen movies.

teenrebellion

Wordle Vocabulary:

 Lust

Coming~of~Age

Rebellion

 Sabotage

Queen~Bee

 Idealistic

Belong

Identity

 Facade

 Fairytale

Search~for~Identity

Mocking

Chick~Flick

Teen~Movies

 Chaos

Balance

Process~of~Learning

 Emotional~Instability

Self~struggle

Arrogant

 Cornayyy

Marketing

Entertainment

 Catfight

Overused

 Adolescence

Rocky~Relationships

Sappy

“So~Hot”

Peer~Pressure

Indulgence

Impulsive

Happily~Ever~After

Prince~Charming

Girl~Politics

Taunt~and~Flaunt

Temptation

Challenge~Authority

Subversion

Lesson

 

If you would like to see our original powerpoint, please click here!

 

 

 

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Replying to Mr. Jones’s blogpost about the New York Times article…

1. What authors or genres of writing are cited as influencing McCarthy’s writing style?

McCarthy’s writing style seem to draw from elaborate authors such as Faulkner and a mix of sophisticated Elizabethan english and real-world dialogue.

2. How does McCarthy treat human characters in his story as opposed to landscape and animals like horses?

McCarthy does not reflect as much thrill and glory in his human characters as he does when describing the landscape and horses in his story.

“In his sleep he could hear the horses stepping among the rocks and he could hear them drink from the shallow pools in the dark where the rocks lay smooth and rectilinear as the stones of ancient ruins and the water from their muzzles dripped and rang like water dripping in a well and in his sleep he dreamt of horses and the horses in his dream moved gravely among the tilted stones like horses come upon an antique site where some ordering of the world had failed and if anything had been written on the stones the weathers had taken it away again and the horses were wary and moved with great circumspection carrying in their blood as they did the recollection of this and other places where horses once had been and would be again. Finally what he saw in his dream was that the order in the horse’s heart was more durable for it was written in a place where no rain could erase it.”

This descriptive excerpt demonstrates a vibrant and poignant  illustration of nature. The author is clearly fascinated by the mystery of horses, and elevates them with traits that transcend the nature of humans (such as the poetic addition of “a place where no rain could erase it” when describing the “durable order in the horse’s heart”).

3. What type of dialogue does the article state McCarthy uses?

The article praises how “realistic dialogue, for which his ear is deadly accurate” adorns the work of McCarthy. In other words, he successfully weaved his dialogue so that it sounds unpolished, natural, and believably happening in the rural areas of America today.

4. What is notable about his diction (word choice)?

Although his word choice is not exceptionally hard, it is sophisticated in the way that it is extremely descriptive and specific.

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